About the Project

Success in nuclear forensics search is a critical component to fighting terrorist activity and preventing disastrous individual terrorist nuclear attacks. The UC Berkeley Nuclear Forensic Search Project takes a computer science algorithmic approach (as a special directed graph matching problem) to address the nuclear forensics search problem, essentially recasting nuclear forensics discovery as a digital library search problem. A simultaneous aim is to encourage other computer scientists to work on nuclear forensics search.


Google Earth Display of Worldwide Nuclear Sites (click to invoke map)
Google Earth Display of Worldwide Nuclear Sites
Data source: maptd

Current Research Team

Team Berkeley From left to right: Jimmy Lee, Colin Gerber, Fred Gey, Ray Larson, Anthony Lubbers, Alex Laut, Electra Sutton, Charles Wang
Not pictured: Professor Ed Morse

Fredric Gey, gey at berkeley.edu (Principal Investigator)
Ray Larson, ray at ischool.berkeley.edu (Co-Principal Investigator)
Edward Morse, morse at nuc.berkeley.edu (Faculty Investigator)
Electra Sutton, electra at berkeley.edu (Senior Scientist)

Colin Gerber, colin.gerber at gmail.com (Graduate Research Trainee)
Charles Wang, charleswang at ischool.berkeley.edu (Graduate Research Trainee)
Alexander Laut (Undergraduate Research Assistant)
Hin Y (Jimmy) Lee (Undergraduate Research Assistant)
Anthony Lubbers (Undergraduate Research Assistant)

Researcher Profiles

Notice

Material found on this web site is based upon work supported by the Department of Homeland Security under Grant No. 2012-DN-077-ARI058-03 and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1140073. Any data, opinions, findings and conclusions or recomendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the Department of Homeland Security or the National Science Foundation (NSF).